The Third Book

on October 12 | in Individual Improvement | by | with Comments Off on The Third Book

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I struggled with the theological backdrop of In The Grip Of Grace, by Max Lucado. It has a Christian bedrock of belief concerning the proper way to live life, the nature of God, and the relationship of the individual to the community. But it’s also a lovely and profound exposition about grace, and I think many readers will find a deeper love of God and more gratitude for this mystery through which we move. It’s an immensely spiritual book written with humor.

So I’m adding it to the Recommended Reads section.

I was left with a bad taste in my mouth from The Zahir, by Paulo Coelho. While the intricate fiction contains important and spiritual statements, this deep rumination on the nature of love ultimately leaves ample room for infidelity within the spiritual endeavor. But it’s exactly that sentiment that left me probing my prejudices and sentimentalities with the recurring compulsion of a tongue to sore tooth. That disagreeable thought gave me a difficult look into my own views on love as they remain bound up in my ideas about myself as a loving person.

So I’m adding it to the Recommended Reads section.

I loved every page of Shaman, by Kim Stanley Robinson. It was a good fiction about prehistoric hunter-gatherers during the Ice Age, and I found a lot of myself in Loon, the main character, and amazingly discovered what it is that I must do next. I see my spiritual journey better after the book and have changed positively because of it. This book comes up in my head more often than the other two, but it has nothing to do with the endeavor of spirituality and contains no profound messages likely to resonate spiritually with many people.

So I’m not adding it to the Recommended Reads section.

Spirituality exists in all books, not just those in a particular section of the bookstore. Most likely, some of your most important books can’t be found in the religious or new age section of the bookstore, and wouldn’t matter at all to me. You know when a book is meant for your spiritual journey, regardless of the section it’s filed under.

I can recommend some books that will help you along your path, but nobody can recommend the books that complete the puzzle of your individual spiritual journey.

For every set of three, you always have to find the third book yourself.

Spirituality exists in all things you do, not just your morning and evening meditations. Most likely, the most spiritual experiences you’ll have will happen when you’re not meditating or praying, and nowhere near a church. Everything you do is an opportunity to choose to work with spirit instead of attempting to control the world.

I can recommend some practices that will help you along your path, but nobody can point the way to the experiences that you need the most. Everyone has to discover those for themselves.

There’s a lot of missing pieces you have to find for yourself… because they’re only for you.

I struggled with the theological backdrop of In The Grip Of Grace, by Max Lucado. It has a Christian bedrock of belief concerning the proper way to live life, the nature of God, and the relationship of the individual to the community. But it’s also a lovely and profound exposition about grace, and I think many readers will find a deeper love of God and more gratitude for this mystery through which we move. It’s an immensely spiritual book written with humor.

So I’m adding it to the Recommended Reads section.

I was left with a bad taste in my mouth from The Zahir, by Paulo Coelho. While the intricate fiction contains important and spiritual statements, this deep rumination on the nature of love ultimately leaves ample room for infidelity within the spiritual endeavor. But it’s exactly that sentiment that left me probing my prejudices and sentimentalities with the recurring compulsion of a tongue to sore tooth. That disagreeable thought gave me a difficult look into my own views on love as they remain bound up in my ideas about myself as a loving person.

So I’m adding it to the Recommended Reads section.

I loved every page of Shaman, by Kim Stanley Robinson. It was a good fiction about prehistoric hunter-gatherers during the Ice Age, and I found a lot of myself in Loon, the main character, and amazingly discovered what it is that I must do next. I see my spiritual journey better after the book and have changed positively because of it. This book comes up in my head more often than the other two, but it has nothing to do with the endeavor of spirituality and contains no profound messages likely to resonate spiritually with many people.

So I’m not adding it to the Recommended Reads section.

Spirituality exists in all books, not just those in a particular section of the bookstore. Most likely, some of your most important books can’t be found in the religious or new age section of the bookstore, and wouldn’t matter at all to me. You know when a book is meant for your spiritual journey, regardless of the section it’s filed under.

I can recommend some books that will help you along your path, but nobody can recommend the books that complete the puzzle of your individual spiritual journey.

For every set of three, you always have to find the third book yourself.

Spirituality exists in all things you do, not just your morning and evening meditations. Most likely, the most spiritual experiences you’ll have will happen when you’re not meditating or praying, and nowhere near a church. Everything you do is an opportunity to choose to work with spirit instead of attempting to control the world.

I can recommend some practices that will help you along your path, but nobody can point the way to the experiences that you need the most. Everyone has to discover those for themselves.

There’s a lot of missing pieces you have to find for yourself… because they’re only for you.

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